Welcome!

Welcome to the Psychodrama Research blog! The blog is a place to find resources devoted to research in Psychodrama, Sociometry and Group Psychotherapy. The listserv is a tool for communicating with others who share such interests.  No prior experience is needed, just a desire to participate. We welcome beginners, experienced researchers and those who may be on the fence considering whether they want to test the research waters. Open minds all invited.  We began as an email list, moved briefly to a google group, but hope this is more user friendly.

The idea is to offer places to exchange ideas, ask questions, get feedback, run research designs by interested others, think things through together, find collaborators, get suggestions, share instruments, and generally encourage and foster research projects in the field, or, for that matter, in related fields. On the  blog there will be postings and bibliographies, articles, websites, videos or links to them that are in line with our interests. Maybe we will even run some drafts by one another to get reactions. Constructive criticism and thoughtful discussion are grist for the mill.  The listserv should be useful to discuss whatever is up relating to research and writing.  When you want a particular person or few people to respond, please write to that person or  persons directly to avoid cluttering up others’ email.

Research and writing in the practice are not only important to the future of the field, they are intriguing and exciting. Instruments others have found useful may be helpful to you. Ways to get around design problems can be discussed. Materials that you have found that others may not have seen can be shared. Let’s see what kind of good work we can stir up and support one another in doing!

We have a blog and associated listserv. Anyone can post to the listserv.  Posts to the blog will go through the moderator. Both will have archived material so old stuff can be accessed.  To keep the listserv discussion moving, please post in short messages– up to, say, 3 brief paragraphs, and, of course, please try to make the material of general interest. Making use of links will be concise and efficient. If you have a more particular communication to make, please send it to the individual or few you address directly and not to the list. If you have a paper you think people should read, a survey you want to put out, a bibliography to share, or any longer piece of material, suggest it to the list moderator for the blog at ericahollander@comcast.net .

If you don’t want to be included in the list, send a note to ericahollander@comcast.net.  How does that all sound?

We ‘re off!

 

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Informed Consent for Multi-Site Research Project

Informed Consent to Participate in Study of Psychodrama Effects

INTRODUCTION You are invited to join a research study to look at the effectiveness of psychodrama. Please take whatever time you need to discuss the study with your family and friends, or anyone else you wish to. The decision to join, or not to join, is up to you. In this research study, we are investigating/testing/comparing/evaluating the results of psychodrama therapy.

WHAT IS INVOLVED IN THE STUDY? If you decide to participate you will be asked to fill out 4 scales, one demographic questionnaire, and a checklist before and after a session of psychodrama. We think this will take you 5-10minutes at the start of the session and less than that at the conclusion. The investigators may stop the study or take you out of the study at any time they judge it is in your best interest. They may also remove you from the study for various other reasons. They can do this without your consent. You can stop participating at any time. If you stop you will not lose any benefits.

RISKS This study involves no known risks. There may be risks that we cannot predict.

BENEFITS TO TAKING PART IN THE STUDY It is reasonable to expect the following benefits from this research: that your answers will help us understand what results come from psychodrama. However, we can’t guarantee that you will personally experience benefits from participating in this study. Others may benefit in the future from the information we find in this study.

CONFIDENTIALITY We will take the following steps to keep information about you confidential, and to protect it from unauthorized disclosure, tampering, or damage: ___________ Data will be coded and kept in confidential files so that your answers will not be traceable to you. Numeric data will be aggregated and analyzed at a central location from a number of different locations, but identifiers will have been removed before that occurs. The study is concerned with how psychodrama is or is not effective and is not directed at any particular individual’s reactions to it. Every effort will be made to keep your identity confidential. The only place where a file will exist that contains your name in this study will be in the office where you sign up to participate.

INCENTIVES none

YOUR RIGHTS AS A RESEARCH PARTICIPANT Participation in this study is voluntary. You have the right not to participate at all or to leave the study at any time. Deciding not to participate or choosing to leave the study will not result in any penalty or loss of benefits to which you are entitled, and it will not harm your relationship with your provider.

CONTACTS FOR QUESTIONS OR PROBLEMS Call ____________________ at ___________________ or email___________ at ___________if you have questions about the study, any problems, unexpected physical or psychological discomforts, any injuries, or think that something unusual or unexpected is happening.

Contact _____________________________if you have any questions or concerns about your rights as a research participant. Consent of Subject (or Legally Authorized Representative) Signature of Subject or Representative

Date _________________________________________________ [The template for this consent form was taken from the Office for Protection of Research Subjects website of the Department of Health and Human Services in October 2014.  You should check your local institution and jurisdiction for other requirements.

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Multi-site research project on effectiveness of psychodrama Outcome Scales and Inventory of Techniques Follow

How Are You (HAY) Scales

Pre-Session

Please mark your self-ratings by drawing a line on the scale.

For example, if the question is how much you enjoy hiking, and you think it is a little more than 8, you would respond like this:

0…..….1…..….2…..….3…..….4…..….5…..….6…..….7…..….8….|.…9…..….10

Scale 1: Doing Well

Indicate how positive you are about yourself. Include experiences of feeling: capable, resilient, confident, empowered, adaptable, spontaneous, creative, prepared, knowledgeable, energized, and so forth.

My sense of how well I am doing is: 0…..….1…..….2…..….3…..….4…..….5…..….6…..….7…..….8…..….9…..….10

Scale 2: Distress

Indicate how down you are about yourself. Include experiences of feeling: uncertain, unprepared, guilty, defensive, ashamed, anxious, depressed, and so forth.

My degree of distress is: 0…..….1…..….2…..….3…..….4…..….5…..….6…..….7…..….8…..….9…..….10

Scale 3: Connectedness

Indicate how close you feel to others in your life. Include experiences of feeling: accepted, connected, supported, belonging, understood, and so forth.

My sense of being connected is: 0…..….1…..….2…..….3…..….4…..….5…..….6…..….7…..….8…..….9…..….10

Post-Session

Please mark your self-ratings by drawing a line on the scale.

For example, if the question is how much you enjoy hiking, and you think it is a little more than 8, you would respond like this: 0…..….1…..….2…..….3…..….4…..….5…..….6…..….7…..….8….|.…9…..….10

Scale 1: Doing Well

Indicate how positive you are about yourself. Include experiences of feeling: capable, resilient, confident, empowered, adaptable, spontaneous, creative, prepared, knowledgeable, energized, and so forth.

My sense of how well I am doing is: 0…..….1…..….2…..….3…..….4…..….5…..….6…..….7…..….8…..….9…..….10

Scale 2: Distress

Indicate how down you are about yourself. Include experiences of feeling: uncertain, unprepared, guilty, defensive, ashamed, anxious, depressed, and so forth.

My degree of distress is: 0…..….1…..….2…..….3…..….4…..….5…..….6…..….7…..….8…..….9…..….10

Scale 3: Connectedness

Indicate how close you feel to others in your life. Include experiences of feeling: accepted, connected, supported, belonging, understood, and so forth.

My sense of being connected is: 0…..….1…..….2…..….3…..….4…..….5…..….6…..….7…..….8…..….9…..….10

 

Scale 4: Help

Indicate how helpful the experience/intervention has been for you. Include reactions of feeling: encouraged, supported, better prepared, more knowledgeable, assured, and so forth.

My sense of being helped is: 0…..….1…..….2…..….3…..….4…..….5…..….6…..….7…..….8…..….9…..….10

Scale 5: Harm

Indicate how much harm/hurt the experience/intervention has done you. Include experiences of feeling: wounded, threatened, overwhelmed, caught off guard, coerced, and so forth. My sense of being harmed is: 0…..….1…..….2…..….3…..….4…..….5…..….6…..….7…..….8…..….9…..….10

 

Intervention Fidelity Checklist Check if the following elements/aspects of psychodramatic intervention were present.

Components

Warm-up

Theme/Issue Selection

Scene Setting

Catharsis of Abreaction

Surplus Reality

Catharsis of Integration

Sharing

Roles

Protagonist

Auxiliary Ego

Double

Audience

Techniques

Role-reversal

Mirror

Concretization

Session

Data

Date:

Title:

 

 

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Group Therapy Workbook: Integrating Cognitive Behavioral Therapy with Psychodrama Theory and Practice by Treadwell, Dartnell, Travaglini, Staats, and Devinney

Now out, published by Outskirts Press, very straightforward and clear.

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Harvard Study– 75 yrs of studying

After 75 years of study, the results on what works for well being and health.  Sociometry may be the main thing.  [ted id=2399]

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Samsha accepting submissions to registry of evidence based practice

Dear Colleagues,

I am excited to share with you significant information. Beginning on November 23, 2015, and ending on January 26, 2016 the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) is accepting submissions to the National Registry of Evidence-based Programs and Practices (NREPP). This is a searchable online database of mental health and substance abuse interventions. We are reaching out explicitly to encourage the submission of qualifying medication-assisted treatment practices and continuing care management.

SAMHSA developed NREPP to target effective substance abuse and mental health services to the people most in need, and to translate research in these areas more effectively and more rapidly into the general health care system. The purpose of NREPP is to help the public learn more about available evidence-based programs and practices and determine which of these may best meet their needs.

To be considered for review, interventions must meet the following three minimum requirements:

Research or evaluation of the intervention has assessed mental health or substance use outcomes among individuals, communities, or populations OR other behavioral health related outcomes on individuals, communities, or populations with or at risk of mental health issues or substance use problems.
Evidence of these outcomes has been demonstrated in at least one study using an experimental or quasi-experimental design.

Comparative effectiveness trials, in which two interventions, both presumed to be equally effective, are compared, and studies in which the effects of the same intervention on various subpopulations are compared or in which various doses or components of the same intervention are compared will not be reviewed, but may be submitted as supporting documentation.
The results of these studies have been published in a peer-reviewed journal or other professional publication, or documented in a comprehensive evaluation report, published within the previous 25 years (1990 or later).
For further information and questions please visit the NREPP website at: http://www.nrepp.samhsa.gov/Index.aspx or contact the NREPP staff by email at nrepp@samhsa.hhs.gov or by phone at 1-866-436-7377. You may also contact Mitra Ahadpour related to Medication Assisted Treatment NREPP at 240-276-2134, mitra.ahadpour@samhs.hhs.gov.

Sincerely,

Daryl W. Kade
Acting Director
Center for Substance Abuse Treatment

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Can viewers tell the difference between abstract art by artists and children’s paintings?

Seeing the Mind Behind the Art : People Can Distinguish Abstract Expressionist Paintings From Highly Similar Paintings by Children, Chimps, Monkeys, and Elephants
Angelina Hawley-Dolan and Ellen Winner
Psychological Science published online 3 March 2011 DOI: 10.1177/0956797611400915
The online version of this article can be found at:
http://pss.sagepub.com/content/early/2011/03/01/0956797611400915

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An article on “sparks” of interest and sociometric support for those interests in 15 year olds

To link to this article: http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/10888691.2014.894414

The authors of this article discuss how social support for constructive interests of adolescents shapes them.

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Post traumatic stress leads to growth in female survivors of Katrina years down the road

Jean Rhodes of U. of Massachusetts Boston and her group found that greater stress from hurricane Katrina was associated with greater growth years later in the low income adult female population they studied. They suggest that for some survivors of disaster a greater sense of meaning and purpose develops following severe trauma. Go to Jean Rhodes website and click on “Post Traumatic Growth” to find the article in full in pdf.

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A talk on spirituality and health and how to measure spirituality

Dr. Gail Ironson of University of Miami has found that spirituality helps in cases of physical illness. https://youtu.be/CsuI8ZCA7mc

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Using Psychodrama in Medical Education in Brazil

www.scielo.br has an article on 7 different studies of the uses of psychodrama in medical education in Brazil.

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